Regionalism in canadian literature

Regionalism refers to the distinctive local character of a geographic area, or to a people's perception of and identification with such places. In Canada, regional identities were formed after Europeans settled across the continent among distinct First Nations tribes. Today, regionalism is expressed in various provincial identities, in our economy, and in the daily textures of life in different parts of the land.

Regionalism in canadian literature

Regionalism in Literature Geographer R. The popular romance, which dominated Canadian fiction untilencouraged the more sentimental side of regionalism, with quaint peculiarities of mannerism or costume to provide relief from the didacticism and melodrama. Regional literature in the more precise sense is tied to the conventions of realism because it attempts to distinguish accurately the features of a clearly definable region, either rural or closely linked to the land.

In its fullest achievement such regional literature, as the works of Thomas Hardy and William Faulkner show, is not synonymous with surface detail and pedestrian style but with profound exploration of the shaping influence of particular regions on individual lives.

How to cite this page

Certainly much of the most interesting Canadian fiction of the next 15 years is confidently regional: The concurrent decentralization of political power in the s was reflected in various stimuli to the growth and awareness of regional literatures: In the s writers and critics have developed a different approach to region, one that is conceptually broader embracing ideas of culture, wealth and class and theoretically more focused incorporating the sciences of perception, cognition, anthropology and rhetoric.

Regional presses expanded ambitiously, from poetry to chapbooks to fiction and nonfiction, consolidating their regional interests.Regionalism in Canadian Literature Top of Form 1 && The term regionalism is an inevitable idea when it comes to Canadian literature and the never ending search for Canadian identity.

The definition of regionalism in literature is said to be “fiction and poetry that focuses on the characters, dialect, customs, topography, and other features particular to a specific region” (Campbell). The phrase "Canadian regionalism" refers broadly to the vitality of regional differences within Canada.

But it also refers to tensions between national and local economic, institutional and emotional attachments. Regionalism is an inescapable part of society, economy and politics in Canada. The spatial structure of the Canadian economy also worked to make the Canadian regionalism stronger.

Regionalism in canadian literature

In the 19 th century, industrial technology in Canada, which had the capacity to provide for large areas, was usually widespread on the small patches of settlement (Clement, ). Regionalism is a political ideology based on a collective sense of place or attachment, and is discussed in terms of Canadian society, culture, economy and politics (Westfall, 3).

Regionalism in Literature | The Canadian Encyclopedia

Canada is known internationally as a nation incorporating several multiregional interests and identities into its unification of culture. The popular romance, which dominated Canadian fiction until , encouraged the more sentimental side of regionalism, with quaint peculiarities of mannerism or costume to provide relief from the didacticism and melodrama.

Regionalism in canadian literature

In Canadian literature: The Montreal School, – the aesthetes (exotistes) and the regionalists. The aesthetes, among them René Chopin, Marcel Dugas, Paul Morin, and Robert de Roquebrune, had studied in Paris and were fascinated by contemporary French literature and culture.

Regionalism | The Canadian Encyclopedia